#goldschmidt2021 We contribute our work on dissipative dynamics and frequency distributions in river geochemistry and an update on the thermodynamics of planetary evolution.

Our work on thermodynamics and the Goldschmidt conference on geochemistry – well, that seems like an obvious match. But what we contribute is a little different, and the match is not quite so straightforward. What our perspective adds is (a) a focus on non-equilibrium thermodynamics and disequilibrium, and the processes that generate and dissipate this disequilibrium, and (b) a system‘s view which accounts for the environmental setting as well as the interactions and feedbacks within the Earth as an overarching thermodynamic system. Both of our contributions next week nicely illustrate these points and show how important it is to think „thermodynamics“ beyond its more narrow application to geochemical reactions.

Continue reading “#goldschmidt2021 We contribute our work on dissipative dynamics and frequency distributions in river geochemistry and an update on the thermodynamics of planetary evolution.”

If you think surface and air temperature are basically the same thing, think again. Or read our new paper.

In meteorology, air temperature measurements are typically taken 2m above the surface.  It is a routine measurement at weather stations, and this temperature is the basis for analyzing trends, such as global warming.  The temperature of the surface is not so often measured, but it can be inferred by satellites from how much radiation is being emitted by the surface.  Being only 2m apart, one may think that the temperatures basically reflect more or less the same, given their close proximity. We actually found out that this is not the case: surface temperature responds much more strongly to a lack of water than air temperature.  This finding was just published in our article in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. Continue reading “If you think surface and air temperature are basically the same thing, think again. Or read our new paper.”